Overcoming Poverty with Climate Actions

 

That the impacts of climate change will unduly affect the poorest and most vulnerable people in the world is well established. Climate change is embedded within the same complex and interconnected socio-economic, political, technological, industrial and environmental systems as poverty and inequality. In an unequal world, what does the imperative to mitigate and adapt to climate change mean and for whom? 
 

How can actions on climate change be orientated to minimise harm to poor people? What is the role of powerful institutions and governments? Is success enhanced if it also yields co-benefits for poverty and inequality?
 

We build understanding about how actions on climate change interrelate and interact with the multiple dimensions of poverty and inequality within and between nations. We also seek to explore areas and sectors where the synergies are not so readily identifiable. This includes the more difficult decisions on trade-offs between climate change mitigation and adaption and different dimensions of poverty and inequality.

We explore why some visions have traction and others do not. How can actions to address the causes and impacts of climate change incorporate the multiple dimensions of poverty and inequality, and vice versa? In what ways and under which circumstances do climate change, poverty and inequality interact? What are the structural and systemic barriers and enablers that facilitate or undermine effective work and comprehensive understanding of poverty and climate change actions, and how can these be overcome?

We use political economy approaches, including in the energy, forestry and agricultural sectors, to understand how decisions are made and influenced to create knowledge on the political barriers to the success of technical climate actions.

Our research practice and advocacy contribute to understanding how poverty, climate change and inequality interactfor greatest opportunity.