Mark Tebboth

University of East Anglia

Lecturer

 

Biography

Mark Tebboth is the theme co-leader for the Tyndall Centre's research activities on understanding how to address the twin goals of poverty alleviation and achieving meaningful action on climate change. The overarching focus of the theme is to explore synergies and trade-offs between climate action and poverty (orientated around the different Sustainable Development Goals) all set against the backdrop of increasing urgency and an imperative to act. As well Dr Tebboth’s work with the Tyndall Centre, he is also a Lecturer in Environment and International Development in the School of International Development (DEV) at UEA. He teaches on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses covering issues linked to the governance of natural resources, climate change, and migration. Prior to joining DEV as a lecturer, Dr Tebboth was employed as a Senior Research Associate during which time he worked on a number of research projects including coordinating of a major programme of research in the pastoralist drylands of East Africa (Ethiopia and Kenya) through the Adaptation at Scale in Semi-Arid Regions (ASSAR) research project funded by IDRC/DFID.

 

Research Interests

Dr Tebboth is an interdisciplinary social scientist whose research addresses issues related to how people and populations respond to and adapt to risks arising primarily from global environmental and, more specifically anthropogenic climate change. Within this broad area of research, he has particular interests in human migration / mobility and forced displacement, vulnerability, resilience and adaptation, and disaster risk reduction.

 

Current Research Projects

Climate Resilient Development Pathways for Semi-arid Regions of Africa and South Asia

DRIER – Drought Resilience In East African Dryland Regions

Recovery with Dignity

 

Featured publications

Singh, C., Tebboth, M. G. L., Spear, D., Ansah, P., and Mensah, A. (2019) Opening up the methodological toolkit on climate change vulnerability and adaptation research: reflections from using life history approaches. Regional Environmental Change; doi.org/10.1007/s10113-019-01562-z

People in developing countries face multiple risks, and their response decisions sit at the complex and often opaque interface of climatic stressors, constrained resource access, and changing livelihoods, social structures, and personal aspirations. Many risk management studies use a well-established toolkit of methodologies—household surveys, focus group discussions, and semi-structured interviews. This paper argues that such methodological conservatism tends to neglect the dynamic and differentiated nature of livelihood decisions. Since different methodologies privilege different portrayals of risk and response. The paper highlights how plural methodological approaches can capture a broader range of perspectives and problematisations and draws on the life-history method of interviews across four countries (Kenya, Namibia, Ghana, and India) to offer one way of expanding current methodological approaches on vulnerability and adaptation.

 

Conway, D., Nicholls, R. J., Brown, S., Tebboth, M. G. L., Adger, W. N., Bashir, A., Biemans, H., Crick, F., Lutz, A. F., Safra De Campos, R., Said, M., Singh, C., Zaroug, M. A. H., Ludi, E., New, M., and Wester, P. (2019), Recognising the need for bottom-up assessments of climate risks and adaptation in climate-sensitive regions. Nature Climate Change 9: 7, pp 503-511; doi.org/10.1038/s41558-019-0502-0

Studies of climate change at specific intervals of future warming have primarily been addressed through top-down approaches using climate projections and modelled impacts. In contrast, bottom-up approaches focus on the recent past and present vulnerability. Here, we examine climate signals at different increments of warming and consider the need to reconcile top-down and bottom-up approaches. We synthesise insights from recent studies in three climate-sensitive systems where change is a defining feature of the human-environment system. Whilst top-down and bottom-up approaches generate complementary insights into who and what is at risk, integrating their results is a much-needed step towards developing relevant information to address the needs of immediate adaptation decisions.

 

Tebboth, M. G. L., Conway, D., and Adger, W. N., (2019) Mobility endowment and mobility entitlements mediate resilience in rural livelihood systems. Global Environmental Change 54, pp 174-183; doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2018.12.002

In economically marginal rural areas, choice in livelihood strategy such as decisions to move location mediates levels of individual and household resilience under conditions of environmental change. It is widely recognised that endowments associated with mobility and the entitlement to mobility are unevenly distributed across populations. This paper integrates these insights and conceptualises location choice as a set of mobility endowments and mobility entitlements. Through focussing on endowments and entitlements, the paper explores how choice affects the ability to be mobile and its role in mediating levels of resilience to livelihood shocks associated with changing environmental conditions. The paper affirms that choice and the ability to enact those choices mediates resilience, it highlights the implications of location decisions but also the conditions in which those decisions are made.

 

Tebboth, M. G. L., Few, R., Assen, M., and Degefu, M. A., (2020) Valuing local perspectives on invasive species management: moving beyond the ecosystem service-disservice dichotomy.  Ecosystem Services 42; doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2020.101068

This paper uses the concept of ecosystem disservices to explore and understand how rapid environmental change associated with an invasive plant species is framed and understood by different stakeholders. Through a focus on narratives, the paper explores how socially-differentiated populations understand the causes and consequences of a plant invasion and express preferences for often contrasting management interventions.

 

Other Selected publications

Few, R., Spear, D., Singh, C., Tebboth, M., Davies, J. and Thompson-Hall, M. (2020) Culture as a mediator of climate change adaptation: neither static nor unidirectional WIREs Climate Change DOI:10.1002/wcc.687

Cundill, G., Harvey, B., Tebboth, M., Cochrane, L., Currie-Alder, B., Vincent, K., Lawn, J., Nichols, R. J., Scodanibbio, L., Prakash, A., New, M., Wester, P., Leone, M., Morchain, D., Ludi, E., DeMaria-Kinney, J., Khan, A., Landry, M., (2019) Large-scale transdisciplinary collaboration: Challenges and Insights. Global Challenges 1700132.  https://doi.org/10.1002/gch2.201700132

Tebboth, M. G. L., Conway, D., and Adger, W. N., (2019) Mobility endowment and mobility entitlements mediate resilience in rural livelihood systems. Global Environmental Change 54, pp 174-183.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2018.12.002

Singh, C., Tebboth, M. G. L., Spear, D., Ansah, P., and Mensah, A. (2019) Opening up the methodological toolkit on climate change vulnerability and adaptation research: reflections from using life history approaches. Regional Environmental Changehttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-019-01562-z

Tebboth, M. G. L., Few, R., Assen, M., and Degefu, M. A., (2020) Valuing local perspectives on invasive species management: moving beyond the ecosystem service-disservice dichotomy. Ecosystem Services 42.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2020.101068

Few R. and Tebboth, M. (2018) Recognising the dynamics that surround drought impacts. Think Note. Journal of Arid Environments, 157, 113-115.  DOI: 10.1016/j.jaridenv.2018.06.001

 

Contact information

E-mail: m.tebboth@uea.ac.uk

Tel.:+44 (0)1603 59 2861

Address: School of International Development, Arts 1.74, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK.

Twitter: @marktebboth

Institution Profile: https://people.uea.ac.uk/m_tebboth

Further Publications: https://publons.com/researcher/3554909/mark-tebboth/