Partners

The Tyndall Centre is a unique partnership between the universities of East Anglia (Headquarters), Cambridge, Cardiff, Manchester, Newcastle, Oxford, Southampton, Sussex and Fudan University in Shanghai.

University of East Anglia

The Tyndall Centre at UEA spans the faculties of Sciences and Social Sciences. Most researchers are from the School of Environmental Sciences, the School of International Development, the Norwich Business School, and the School of Psychology.

Tyndall UEA’s key areas of research are in climate policy, understanding behaviour, supporting adaptation, removing barriers to low-carbon energy, keeping track of trends in carbon emissions, integrated assessment modelling, and reducing the impact of climate actions on development and poverty alleviation.

Tyndall UEA collaborates with other research centres and groups at UEA, including the Climatic Research Unit, the Water Security Research Centre, and the Adapt Low Carbon Group.

See UEA researchers here. 

Cardiff University

The Tyndall Centre at Cardiff University is based in the School of Psychology, the largest psychology department in the UK with internationally-recognised expertise. Researchers are from the Understanding Risk group and from the Centre for Business Relationships, Accountability, Sustainability and Society (BRASS).  

Tyndall Cardiff’s research focuses on the psychological and social dimensions of climate change mitigation and adaptation. Qualitative and quantitative social science methods inform their work to understand public and stakeholder responses to climate change, and sustainability decision-making by citizens, consumers, businesses, policy-makers and other groups. Expertise in Tyndall Cardiff include: The psychology of climate change; public attitudes towards and acceptability of energy supply systems; sustainable behaviour change and energy demand reduction; social conflicts and siting of large scale energy technologies; risk perception, communication and public engagement; automotive industry and technologies; energy infrastructures; energy futures; sustainable communities; and ecological footprinting.

Tyndall Cardiff also draws on expertise from elsewhere within Cardiff University and other universities in Wales, through its membership of the Sustainable Places Research Institute and the Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W). With its position in both C3W and Tyndall, Cardiff University acts as a hub for climate change expertise and channel for exchange between Wales and the rest of the UK.

Cardiff became a Tyndall partner in 2010.

See Cardiff researchers here.

University of Manchester

The Tyndall Centre at the University of Manchester is based in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering and connects closely with colleagues across the University including in the Manchester Business School and the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

Tyndall Manchester’s key areas of research focus on analysing options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, including: emissions pathways and energy system scenarios work at a range of scales, stakeholder perceptions of mitigation solutions including marine renewables and carbon capture and storage, cutting emissions from international transport (aviation and shipping), biomass and biofuels, personal transport policy, community energy finance, energy storage and the water-energy-food nexus. Tyndall Manchester conducts discrete engineering, scientific and social science research, and synthesises findings to provide an integrated system-level understanding of climate change. This combination of specialised and integrated research has contributed to Tyndall Manchester becoming a valuable resource to the business and policy communities, with Centre researchers regularly requested to contribute to high-level policy debates across all spatial scales, from local and regional through to national and global.

See Manchester researchers here.

Newcastle University

The Tyndall Centre at Newcastle University is hosted in the Centre for Earth Systems Engineering Research which is based in the School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences.

Tyndall Newcastle key areas of research cover urban sustainability, infrastructure systems, adaptation and resilience, water resources, climate downscaling and climate impacts analysis, flood and coastal engineering, and spatial planning. The research mission in Tyndall Newcastle is to provide analyses, tools and demonstrations to enable practical responses to the challenges of intensifying global change. They are tackling the complexity of coupled technological, human and natural systems, at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Research is shaping the management of long term change and associated uncertainties, in particular along coastlines, in river basins, within urban areas and nationally.

Newcastle joined the Tyndall Centre in 2004.

See Newcastle researchers here.

University of Southampton

The Tyndall Centre at the University of Southampton has been a Tyndall core partner since the Centre’s inception in 2000 and a wide range of research has been undertaken including earth systems modelling, water resources analysis, renewable energy and geo-engineering.

Tyndall Southampton is currently based in the Faculty of Engineering and the Environment but a close affiliation is maintained with other Faculties and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton allowing a wide range of scientists, engineers and statisticians to collaborate on research projects. 

As part of the Cities and Coasts research theme Tyndall Southampton analyses both the impacts of and responses to climate change for coastal areas and research currently comprises coastal projects on a range of topics including: national assessments of coastal impacts and adaptation, e.g.Ghana and Mozambique; the costs of adapting to sea-level rise around the world, regional assessments of coastal impacts of climate change in the EU, China, India and Africa; risk assessment in port cities and trans-boundary effects of sea-level rise. Members in Southampton have been instrumental in the development of the Tyndall Coastal Simulator, a tool for assessing the interconnected nature of coastal management, coastal engineering and flood and erosion risk. Within these research areas, an overarching goal is the development of an integrated system-level understanding of coastal areas and climate change at multiple scales. Tyndall Southampton is a valuable resource to the business and policy communities, both nationally and internationally, with members contributing to policy research such as UK Foresight and economic costs of adaptation (World Bank).

Tyndall Southampton is undertaking research in remote sensing of the oceans, particularly radar; the probabilistic forecasting of climate change including the study of uncertainty in complex numerical models; integrated assessment of delta areas for poverty alleviation (ESPA deltas) and reduced complexity modelling of coasts in the UK (iCOASST).

See Southampton researchers here.

University of Sussex

The Tyndall Centre at the University of Sussex was founded in 2000. Tyndall Sussex research is managed as part of the Sussex Energy Group a leading social science research group that conducts engaged, multidisciplinary research on transitions to low carbon energy systems.

The Sussex Energy Group is based in the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) in the School of Business Management and Economics www.sussex.ac.uk/bmec/. Tyndall Sussex research has also drawn on other competences within the University of Sussex, particularly the Departments of Economics and Geography. Members of the Sussex Energy Group also collaborate on climate change and energy research with colleagues in the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) – including research within the ESRC STEPS Centre and through the Climate Change and Development Centre

Tyndall Sussex research focuses on climate change mitigation by analysing the implications of climate science for changes in energy systems – with a particular focus on low carbon pathways for developing countries. Current and recent examples of projects include the application of the Tyndall Manchester carbon budgeting methodology for a report: China’s Energy Transition, several phases of work with Indian and Chinese institutions on low carbon innovation and technology transfer to inform the UN climate negotiations, a series of consultancies for international agencies on low carbon innovation and development, and a project on interactions between global climate and trade policy regimes (with the Department of Economics). 

See Sussex researchers here.

University of Cambridge

The Tyndall Centre at Cambridge University is based in the Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research (4CMR), within the Department of Land Economy. It conducts research, education and engagement in the interdisciplinary area of coupled energy-economy-environment modelling, with an emphasis on assessing strategies of climate change mitigation. 4CMR modelling evaluates short and long-term impacts of climate change policy on an array of indicators of social and environmental well-being. The key model is the Energy-Environment-Economy Model at the Global Level (E3MG). This model has evolved from research that includes contributions from Economics Nobel Prize laureates and the governor of the Bank of England, and reflects a rich heritage in research excellence.

See Cambridge researchers here.

University of Oxford

The Tyndall Centre at Oxford is based in the Environmental Change Institute (ECI), School of Geography and the Environment. ECI works closely with the School of Geography and the Environment and includes members from other departments such as the people behind climateprediction.net in the Department of Atmospheric Physics.

Tyndall Oxford’s research focuses on adaptation to climate change, particularly in urban areas, and in support of infrastructures. Researchers in Oxford played a major role in the development and use of the Tyndall Centre's Urban Integrated Assessment Facility, the major ‘4 degrees and beyond’ conference of 2010, and in leading the Infrastructure Transitions Research Consortium which is now in its third phase and informs UK government planning on climate change adaptation. 

See Oxford researchers here.